Autonomous Vehicle Safety Regulation World Congress 2017
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2017 Conference Program

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Day 1

Monday 23 October

8.15am - 8.50am - Networking Breakfast
Conference Foyer Area

Join us on the opening morning for our complimentary networking breakfast. All speakers, delegates, and sponsors are invited to attend.

9am - 10.15am - Opening session
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Paul Hemmersbaugh, chief counsel and policy director for Transportation as a Service, General Motors, USA

9am - Opening Address - National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
Heidi King, deputy administrator and acting administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, USA
Ongoing developments of the Federal Automated Vehicles Policy - Accelerating the Next Revolution In Roadway Safety

9.25am - Autonomous vehicles: traffic safety issues for states
Dr James Hedlund, principal, Highway Safety North, USA
The presentation will discuss key policy issues addressed in Autonomous Vehicles Meet Human Drivers: Traffic Safety Issues for States (GHSA, 2017). Autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be in operation soon, but they will share the road with human drivers for decades. States must encourage AV development and implementation while protecting public safety. Key state issues include AV testing regulations, AV certification and registration, laws affecting AV operations such as speed limits and following distances, law enforcement, crash investigation, state data systems, and liability and insurance. States should stay informed and be active but cautious on these issues.

9.50am - Findings of the Commission on Autonomous Vehicle Testing and Safety
Dr Amitai Bin-Nun, director, Autonomous Vehicle Initiative, SAFE, USA
The Commission on Autonomous Vehicle Testing and Safety was formed to investigate best practices for AV testing and early deployment. The Commission was led by recognized experts in the field of safety, automotive and national security. In January 2017, the Commission released its recommendations for autonomous vehicles (AV) to address several public policy and safety issues that have the potential to slow or halt the deployment of autonomous vehicles (AVs). This session will cover the Commission’s best-practice recommendations, which seek to encourage industry leadership and foster increased collaboration between developers and regulators and improved public trust in AV technology.

10.15am - 10.45am - Break

10.45am - 1pm - State DMV's - The Safe Testing of AV Technology on Public Roads
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Catherine Curtis, director vehicle programs, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, USA

10.45am - A perspective from the California Department of Motor Vehicles
Dr Bernard Soriano, deputy director, California Department of Motor Vehicles, USA
This presentation will review the regulations implemented and the ongoing development of testing and deployment regulations in California.

11.10am - How AAMVA is helping the motor vehicle and traffic enforcement agencies prepare for the impact of AVs
Catherine Curtis, director vehicle programs, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, USA
This session will provide an overview of the work being done by the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) through its Autonomous Vehicles Working Group. The purpose of the group is to work with the AAMVA jurisdictions, law enforcement, NHTSA and other federal agencies as well as other stakeholders to gather, organise and share information with the AAMVA community related to the development, design, testing, use and regulation of autonomous vehicles and other emerging vehicle technology. Based on the group's research, a guideline will be developed to assist member jurisdictions in regulating autonomous vehicles and testing the drivers who operate them.

11.35am - 1pm - Panel Discussion on Autonomous and Connected Vehicles - View from the States
A panel of state leaders who are influencing the world of Autonomous Vehicle regulation in the United States will discuss the approach each of their states is taking to regulate the testing and deployment of automated vehicles. Hear how they are working with government officials and other stakeholders in their state to understand and begin to prepare for the impact of automation in vehicles from an administrative and a law enforcement perspective. Some of their areas of concern include developing an understanding of the emerging technology among government officials, working with vehicle manufacturers and research institutes to develop plans to safely test the technology on public roadways.
Kara Templeton, director, Bureau of Driver Licensing, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, USA
Dr Bernard Soriano, deputy director, California Department of Motor Vehicles, USA
James Fackler, assistant administrator, Michigan Department of State, USA
Terrance J. McDonnell, staff sergeant, New York State Police, USA


Moderator:
Catherine Curtis, director vehicle programs, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators

1pm - 2pm - Lunch

2pm - 6pm - The Safe and Successful Integration of AV Technology
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Paul Hemmersbaugh, chief counsel and policy director for Transportation as a Service, General Motors, USA

2pm - Overview of US state and federal automated vehicle regulation and legislation, and principles and suggestions for policymakers going forward
Paul Hemmersbaugh, chief counsel and policy director for Transportation as a Service, General Motors, USA
Changes in federal and state law and regulations are necessary to allow – and facilitate – the safe deployment of autonomous vehicles and realisation of their potential safety, mobility, environmental and other benefits. As a recent former NHTSA chief counsel who now directs AV law and policy efforts for a large automobile manufacturer, this speaker is well-positioned to discuss developing AV policy and regulations. The presentation will provide an overview of recently enacted and pending federal and state regulations governing autonomous vehicles and their use. That survey will be followed by suggestions for some general principles and provisions to guide policymakers’ efforts to facilitate the safe, expeditious and efficient deployment of autonomous vehicles.

2.25pm - Regulatory considerations for fleet-based self-driving operations
Matthew Burton, legal director II, regulatory development, Uber Technologies Inc, USA
As development and testing of self-driving vehicles continues to advance, there is increasing recognition that the early use cases for such vehicles will be in the context of fleet-based deployment, such as ridesharing/for-hire operations. Although regulators have acknowledged that the deployment spectrum will include these uses, some early proposals still assume a more traditional owner-operator deployment paradigm, which may unintentionally delay introduction of these life-saving technologies. The presentation will discuss possible approaches for addressing regulatory and safety objectives in the context of such fleet-based self-driving opportunities.

2.50pm - Creating the right legal framework for AV regulation
Charles Haake, assistant general counsel, Association of Global Automakers, USA
With increased activity at both the state and federal level, now is the time to ensure that we have the proper regulatory framework for AVs. There are currently over 50 bills pending in states on AVs, and this activity could impose potentially conflicting standards. Congress is working on a 16-point outline of potential AV bills at the federal level, one aspect of which is state preemption. But if states were to be preempted from enacting AV regulations, what regulatory framework could fill the vacuum? Would an FMVSS work, or is some other framework needed? The presentation will explore these issues.

3.15pm - 3.45pm - Break

Moderator
Keith Wilson, project manager, technical programs, SAE International, USA

3.45pm - NHTSA/DOT priorities for safe and secure AV technology
Dr Cem Hatipoglu, director, Office of Vehicle Crash Avoidance and Electronic Controls Research, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, USA
An overview of the ongoing regulatory challenges for safe and secure deployment of AV's on the public highway.

4.10pm - Safe path to autonomous driving from an SAE standards perspective
Keith Wilson, project manager, technical programs, SAE International, USA
Automated vehicle technology is a fast-paced and highly complex space. Many disciplines must be brought together to bring the appropriate skillsets to the table and ensure development is robust, safe and secure. Voluntary industry standards are a vital element in ensuring coordinated and interoperable technical development in the emerging AV space, but also to ensure that the future world of mobility enabled by automated vehicles is done safely and securely.

4.35pm - 6pm - SAE Panel Discussion
In this session, a discussion with key SAE International experts, who lead standards development efforts in discipline areas critical to the safe and secure development of automated vehicles.
Sue Bai, principal engineer & chair, SAE Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC), Honda R&D Americas Inc, USA
Mike Ahmadi, global director - IoT Security Solutions & chair, SAE Cybersecurity Assurance Testing Task Force, DigiCert Inc., USA
Dean Chiang, Executive Vice President and Technical Director and Chair, SAE Safety and Human Factors, Dynamic Research Inc, USA
Dr Cem Hatipoglu, director, Office of Vehicle Crash Avoidance and Electronic Controls Research, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, USA
Ron Burton, vice president and member of SAE Active Safety Committee, Transportation Research Center Inc, USA
George Nicols, principal engineer and vice chair of the SAE On Road Automated Driving Committee, Toyota Motor North America, USA


Moderator:
Keith Wilson, project manager, technical programs , SAE International

Day 2

Tuesday 24 October

9am - 1pm - State Departments of Transportation Perspective on Challenges of Autonomous Vehicle Adoption
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Don Hunt, senior fellow, School of Public Affairs Institute, University of Colorado, USA

9am - 10.25am - Panel Discussion - State Departments of Transportation Perspective on Challenges of Autonomous Vehicle Adoption
State DOTs have the overall responsibility to build and operate safe and reliable transportation systems. While many federal and state agencies have a role in guiding the emergence of AVs, state DOTs have a unique role in leading the development of a safe, integrated system. With the emergence of AVs, how are state DOTs working with federal and state agency partners? How are the respective federal and state legislative roles developing? What experience are we gaining from AV public road testing? How will we realise the greatest benefits of connected, automated mobility?
Malcolm Dougherty, director, Caltrans, USA
Leslie Richards, secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, USA
Kirk Steudle, director, Michigan Department of Transportation, USA
Shailen Bhatt, executive director, Colorado Department of Transportation, USA


Moderator:
Don Hunt, senior fellow, School of Public Affairs Institute, University of Colorado

10.25am - 10.55am - Break

10.55am - Caltrans’ Role in Helping California Transportation Agencies Prepare for AV’s
Malcolm Dougherty, director, Caltrans, USA
As California’s state department of transportation, Caltrans and the state serve as leaders in setting standards for the testing and operation of AVs in California. Standardization, without subverting local authorities, is critical for safety on the roadways, as operation of our state’s transportation infrastructure is complicated by the sheer number of agencies involved: Caltrans, 58 counties, and more than 500 incorporated cities. Soon, AV’s will transition from testing to implementation, and Caltrans will continue to play a leadership role in helping these agencies prepare for changes to the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of their facilities to accommodate them.

11.20am - Michigan at the heart of AV testing
Kirk Steudle, director, Michigan Department of Transportation, USA
As the home of the USA’s automotive industry, Michigan has been with the automobile at every stage of its development and is now set to help make autonomy a reality. This presentation will focus on three key points: Michigan’s standpoint on on-road AV testing to establish what parameters need to be met to gain real-world AV driving data on Michigan’s highways; understanding how partnerships with local governments can help foster the innovation that will accelerate the rollout of AVs; scoping out Michigan’s legislative standpoint on AVs to see how deployment will take place on Michigan’s roads.

11.45am - State regulations: putting the cart before the autonomous vehicle?
Kevin Biesty, deputy director for policy, Arizona Department of Transportation, USA
States are employing a variety of strategies with regard to regulating the testing of AVs. Some have prescriptive rules and reporting requirements; others are taking a wait-and-see approach. Arizona's approach is to let innovative technology companies and entrepreneurs take the lead and do what they do best – drive the economy through the creation of services, products and jobs. Arizona's Governor and his agencies are working in a supportive role by removing any non public safety regulations while working with industry to develop the future of transportation and mobility and any necessary regulations only if clearly necessary.

12.10pm - State pathways for deployment of driver-assistive truck platooning technology
Nandi Chhabra, market development & legal affairs manager, Peloton Technology, USA
In December 2016, Michigan became the first state to explicitly authorize deployment of truck platooning technology. At least 10 other states have since considered doing the same through legislative or administrative pathways, including states with a numeric following distance standard for combination vehicles, and those with a qualitative 'reasonable and prudent'-type standard. This presentation will describe language and processes that states have explored toward deployment of SAE Level 1 driver-assistive truck platooning (DATP). Its purpose is to provide DOTs, LEOs and others with insight into options for DATP technology review and definitions of key terms such as 'connected braking'.

12.35pm - AV regulation, capital markets and democracy
Matt Wansley, general counsel, nuTonomy, USA
Regulating autonomous vehicles (AVs) should not be a purely technocratic exercise. If regulation creates optimal incentives for safety, the number of fatal collisions due to the failure of AV software will be greater than zero. But a fatal collision—especially if the victim is a bystander—may trigger a popular backlash and a legislative crackdown against AV technology. This may in turn trigger capital flight and delay the introduction of AV technology, perversely increasing total fatalities. In this talk, I will discuss how AV safety regulation might mitigate legislative and capital backlash risk while preserving democratic values.

1pm - 2pm - Lunch

2pm - 5.30pm - Legal Challenges: Product Liability, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Ethics, Insurance, and Regulatory Compliance
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Prof Nicholas Wittner, Professor of Law in Residence, Michigan State University College of Law, USA

2pm - Regulation of highly automated vehicles
Emily Frascaroli, counsel, Ford Motor Co, USA
The development of highly automated, self-driving vehicles – which have the potential to help people drive more safely and facilitate mobility for everyone – is rapidly advancing. One of the key global challenges is creating a regulatory framework that encourages innovation, while also ensuring safety. Getting the right policies in place for automated vehicles is critically important and requires policy makers and other interested stakeholders to work together to reduce barriers and find a reasonable path forward to allow testing and deployment. This presentation explores the current challenges in the USA, and discusses some potential solutions under consideration.

2.25pm - Automated and connected vehicles require both privacy and cybersecurity
Prof Dorothy Glancy, professor of Law, Santa Clara University School of Law, USA
Assuring privacy and cybersecurity will present ethical and legal challenges for automated and connected vehicles. Trust that is essential to early acceptance of these innovative forms of advanced mobility will require demonstrated assurance of both privacy and cybersecurity. Ethical responsibilities regarding respect for the persons who use automated and connected vehicles are sure to be reflected in legal obligations. Relationships between privacy and cybersecurity are interestingly asymmetrical. An existing body of privacy laws, such as statutes restricting surveillance and personal information practices, is ready to apply to automated and connected vehicles. Laws governing cybersecurity are relatively scarce at present.

2.50pm - Road ready? Adapting safety standards for real-life public testing
Thomas Branigan, managing partner, Bowman and Brooke LLP, USA
The presentation will discuss adapting current safety standards and regulations to allow further testing of autonomous vehicles on public roads.

3.15pm - 3.45pm - Break

3.45pm - Product liability: bump in the road or big pothole?
Prof Nicholas Wittner, Professor of Law in Residence, Michigan State University College of Law, USA
A new era has begun: vehicle-to-vehicle communications systems and automated vehicle technologies. What legal liabilities, especially product liability, do they present? Are they novel ones? Will product liability laws stand as an obstacle to their full implementation? How can the legal risks be reduced to further their roll-out? Some legal scholars maintain that there is nothing special about them that the current liability laws cannot handle – no different from when buggies became horseless carriages. Others, including many legal practitioners, vehemently disagree. This presentation explores these issues and provides the roadmap for the panel discussion that follows.

4.10pm - 5.30pm - Panel Discussion - And Now the Law: Product Liability, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Ethics, Insurance, and Regulatory Compliance
This program presents a comprehensive overview and then detailed discussion of each of the significant legal issues involving the design, testing, development, and regulatory compliance of automated and connected vehicles. The presenters are leading lawyers, law professors, and auto industry counsel with deep expertise in federal and state regulations for deploying test and real-world fleets; product liability and ways to avoid it; cybersecurity and privacy laws; “ethical issues” for automated vehicle decision-making; and novel auto insurance challenges posed by these technologies.” (In short, everything you ever wanted to know about the law and automated and connected vehicles!)
Jennifer Dukarski, shareholder, Butzel Long, USA
Thomas Branigan, managing partner, Bowman and Brooke LLP, USA
Neal Walters, partner, Ballard Spahr LLP, USA
Jason Orr, attorney, O'Melveny & Myers LLP, USA
Thomas Alleman, member, Dykema Cox Smith, USA


Moderator:
Nicholas Wittner, Professor of Law in Residence, Michigan State University College of Law


Day 1

Monday 23 October

8.15am - 8.50am - Networking Breakfast
Conference Foyer Area

Join us on the opening morning for our complimentary networking breakfast. All speakers, delegates, and sponsors are invited to attend.

9am - 10.15am - Opening session
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Paul Hemmersbaugh, chief counsel and policy director for Transportation as a Service, General Motors, USA

9am - Opening Address - National Highway Traffic Safety Administration
Heidi King, deputy administrator and acting administrator, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, USA
Ongoing developments of the Federal Automated Vehicles Policy - Accelerating the Next Revolution In Roadway Safety

9.25am - Autonomous vehicles: traffic safety issues for states
Dr James Hedlund, principal, Highway Safety North, USA
The presentation will discuss key policy issues addressed in Autonomous Vehicles Meet Human Drivers: Traffic Safety Issues for States (GHSA, 2017). Autonomous vehicles (AVs) will be in operation soon, but they will share the road with human drivers for decades. States must encourage AV development and implementation while protecting public safety. Key state issues include AV testing regulations, AV certification and registration, laws affecting AV operations such as speed limits and following distances, law enforcement, crash investigation, state data systems, and liability and insurance. States should stay informed and be active but cautious on these issues.

9.50am - Findings of the Commission on Autonomous Vehicle Testing and Safety
Dr Amitai Bin-Nun, director, Autonomous Vehicle Initiative, SAFE, USA
The Commission on Autonomous Vehicle Testing and Safety was formed to investigate best practices for AV testing and early deployment. The Commission was led by recognized experts in the field of safety, automotive and national security. In January 2017, the Commission released its recommendations for autonomous vehicles (AV) to address several public policy and safety issues that have the potential to slow or halt the deployment of autonomous vehicles (AVs). This session will cover the Commission’s best-practice recommendations, which seek to encourage industry leadership and foster increased collaboration between developers and regulators and improved public trust in AV technology.

10.15am - 10.45am - Break

10.45am - 1pm - State DMV's - The Safe Testing of AV Technology on Public Roads
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Catherine Curtis, director vehicle programs, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, USA

10.45am - A perspective from the California Department of Motor Vehicles
Dr Bernard Soriano, deputy director, California Department of Motor Vehicles, USA
This presentation will review the regulations implemented and the ongoing development of testing and deployment regulations in California.

11.10am - How AAMVA is helping the motor vehicle and traffic enforcement agencies prepare for the impact of AVs
Catherine Curtis, director vehicle programs, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators, USA
This session will provide an overview of the work being done by the American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators (AAMVA) through its Autonomous Vehicles Working Group. The purpose of the group is to work with the AAMVA jurisdictions, law enforcement, NHTSA and other federal agencies as well as other stakeholders to gather, organise and share information with the AAMVA community related to the development, design, testing, use and regulation of autonomous vehicles and other emerging vehicle technology. Based on the group's research, a guideline will be developed to assist member jurisdictions in regulating autonomous vehicles and testing the drivers who operate them.

11.35am - 1pm - Panel Discussion on Autonomous and Connected Vehicles - View from the States
A panel of state leaders who are influencing the world of Autonomous Vehicle regulation in the United States will discuss the approach each of their states is taking to regulate the testing and deployment of automated vehicles. Hear how they are working with government officials and other stakeholders in their state to understand and begin to prepare for the impact of automation in vehicles from an administrative and a law enforcement perspective. Some of their areas of concern include developing an understanding of the emerging technology among government officials, working with vehicle manufacturers and research institutes to develop plans to safely test the technology on public roadways.
Kara Templeton, director, Bureau of Driver Licensing, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, USA
Dr Bernard Soriano, deputy director, California Department of Motor Vehicles, USA
James Fackler, assistant administrator, Michigan Department of State, USA
Terrance J. McDonnell, staff sergeant, New York State Police, USA


Moderator:
Catherine Curtis, director vehicle programs, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators

1pm - 2pm - Lunch

2pm - 6pm - The Safe and Successful Integration of AV Technology
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Paul Hemmersbaugh, chief counsel and policy director for Transportation as a Service, General Motors, USA

2pm - Overview of US state and federal automated vehicle regulation and legislation, and principles and suggestions for policymakers going forward
Paul Hemmersbaugh, chief counsel and policy director for Transportation as a Service, General Motors, USA
Changes in federal and state law and regulations are necessary to allow – and facilitate – the safe deployment of autonomous vehicles and realisation of their potential safety, mobility, environmental and other benefits. As a recent former NHTSA chief counsel who now directs AV law and policy efforts for a large automobile manufacturer, this speaker is well-positioned to discuss developing AV policy and regulations. The presentation will provide an overview of recently enacted and pending federal and state regulations governing autonomous vehicles and their use. That survey will be followed by suggestions for some general principles and provisions to guide policymakers’ efforts to facilitate the safe, expeditious and efficient deployment of autonomous vehicles.

2.25pm - Regulatory considerations for fleet-based self-driving operations
Matthew Burton, legal director II, regulatory development, Uber Technologies Inc, USA
As development and testing of self-driving vehicles continues to advance, there is increasing recognition that the early use cases for such vehicles will be in the context of fleet-based deployment, such as ridesharing/for-hire operations. Although regulators have acknowledged that the deployment spectrum will include these uses, some early proposals still assume a more traditional owner-operator deployment paradigm, which may unintentionally delay introduction of these life-saving technologies. The presentation will discuss possible approaches for addressing regulatory and safety objectives in the context of such fleet-based self-driving opportunities.

2.50pm - Creating the right legal framework for AV regulation
Charles Haake, assistant general counsel, Association of Global Automakers, USA
With increased activity at both the state and federal level, now is the time to ensure that we have the proper regulatory framework for AVs. There are currently over 50 bills pending in states on AVs, and this activity could impose potentially conflicting standards. Congress is working on a 16-point outline of potential AV bills at the federal level, one aspect of which is state preemption. But if states were to be preempted from enacting AV regulations, what regulatory framework could fill the vacuum? Would an FMVSS work, or is some other framework needed? The presentation will explore these issues.

3.15pm - 3.45pm - Break

Moderator
Keith Wilson, project manager, technical programs, SAE International, USA

3.45pm - NHTSA/DOT priorities for safe and secure AV technology
Dr Cem Hatipoglu, director, Office of Vehicle Crash Avoidance and Electronic Controls Research, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, USA
An overview of the ongoing regulatory challenges for safe and secure deployment of AV's on the public highway.

4.10pm - Safe path to autonomous driving from an SAE standards perspective
Keith Wilson, project manager, technical programs, SAE International, USA
Automated vehicle technology is a fast-paced and highly complex space. Many disciplines must be brought together to bring the appropriate skillsets to the table and ensure development is robust, safe and secure. Voluntary industry standards are a vital element in ensuring coordinated and interoperable technical development in the emerging AV space, but also to ensure that the future world of mobility enabled by automated vehicles is done safely and securely.

4.35pm - 6pm - SAE Panel Discussion
In this session, a discussion with key SAE International experts, who lead standards development efforts in discipline areas critical to the safe and secure development of automated vehicles.
Sue Bai, principal engineer & chair, SAE Dedicated Short-Range Communication (DSRC), Honda R&D Americas Inc, USA
Mike Ahmadi, global director - IoT Security Solutions & chair, SAE Cybersecurity Assurance Testing Task Force, DigiCert Inc., USA
Dean Chiang, Executive Vice President and Technical Director and Chair, SAE Safety and Human Factors, Dynamic Research Inc, USA
Dr Cem Hatipoglu, director, Office of Vehicle Crash Avoidance and Electronic Controls Research, National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, USA
Ron Burton, vice president and member of SAE Active Safety Committee, Transportation Research Center Inc, USA
George Nicols, principal engineer and vice chair of the SAE On Road Automated Driving Committee, Toyota Motor North America, USA


Moderator:
Keith Wilson, project manager, technical programs , SAE International


Day 2

Tuesday 24 October

9am - 1pm - State Departments of Transportation Perspective on Challenges of Autonomous Vehicle Adoption
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Don Hunt, senior fellow, School of Public Affairs Institute, University of Colorado, USA

9am - 10.25am - Panel Discussion - State Departments of Transportation Perspective on Challenges of Autonomous Vehicle Adoption
State DOTs have the overall responsibility to build and operate safe and reliable transportation systems. While many federal and state agencies have a role in guiding the emergence of AVs, state DOTs have a unique role in leading the development of a safe, integrated system. With the emergence of AVs, how are state DOTs working with federal and state agency partners? How are the respective federal and state legislative roles developing? What experience are we gaining from AV public road testing? How will we realise the greatest benefits of connected, automated mobility?
Malcolm Dougherty, director, Caltrans, USA
Leslie Richards, secretary, Pennsylvania Department of Transportation, USA
Kirk Steudle, director, Michigan Department of Transportation, USA
Shailen Bhatt, executive director, Colorado Department of Transportation, USA


Moderator:
Don Hunt, senior fellow, School of Public Affairs Institute, University of Colorado

10.25am - 10.55am - Break

10.55am - Caltrans’ Role in Helping California Transportation Agencies Prepare for AV’s
Malcolm Dougherty, director, Caltrans, USA
As California’s state department of transportation, Caltrans and the state serve as leaders in setting standards for the testing and operation of AVs in California. Standardization, without subverting local authorities, is critical for safety on the roadways, as operation of our state’s transportation infrastructure is complicated by the sheer number of agencies involved: Caltrans, 58 counties, and more than 500 incorporated cities. Soon, AV’s will transition from testing to implementation, and Caltrans will continue to play a leadership role in helping these agencies prepare for changes to the planning, design, construction, operation, and maintenance of their facilities to accommodate them.

11.20am - Michigan at the heart of AV testing
Kirk Steudle, director, Michigan Department of Transportation, USA
As the home of the USA’s automotive industry, Michigan has been with the automobile at every stage of its development and is now set to help make autonomy a reality. This presentation will focus on three key points: Michigan’s standpoint on on-road AV testing to establish what parameters need to be met to gain real-world AV driving data on Michigan’s highways; understanding how partnerships with local governments can help foster the innovation that will accelerate the rollout of AVs; scoping out Michigan’s legislative standpoint on AVs to see how deployment will take place on Michigan’s roads.

11.45am - State regulations: putting the cart before the autonomous vehicle?
Kevin Biesty, deputy director for policy, Arizona Department of Transportation, USA
States are employing a variety of strategies with regard to regulating the testing of AVs. Some have prescriptive rules and reporting requirements; others are taking a wait-and-see approach. Arizona's approach is to let innovative technology companies and entrepreneurs take the lead and do what they do best – drive the economy through the creation of services, products and jobs. Arizona's Governor and his agencies are working in a supportive role by removing any non public safety regulations while working with industry to develop the future of transportation and mobility and any necessary regulations only if clearly necessary.

12.10pm - State pathways for deployment of driver-assistive truck platooning technology
Nandi Chhabra, market development & legal affairs manager, Peloton Technology, USA
In December 2016, Michigan became the first state to explicitly authorize deployment of truck platooning technology. At least 10 other states have since considered doing the same through legislative or administrative pathways, including states with a numeric following distance standard for combination vehicles, and those with a qualitative 'reasonable and prudent'-type standard. This presentation will describe language and processes that states have explored toward deployment of SAE Level 1 driver-assistive truck platooning (DATP). Its purpose is to provide DOTs, LEOs and others with insight into options for DATP technology review and definitions of key terms such as 'connected braking'.

12.35pm - AV regulation, capital markets and democracy
Matt Wansley, general counsel, nuTonomy, USA
Regulating autonomous vehicles (AVs) should not be a purely technocratic exercise. If regulation creates optimal incentives for safety, the number of fatal collisions due to the failure of AV software will be greater than zero. But a fatal collision—especially if the victim is a bystander—may trigger a popular backlash and a legislative crackdown against AV technology. This may in turn trigger capital flight and delay the introduction of AV technology, perversely increasing total fatalities. In this talk, I will discuss how AV safety regulation might mitigate legislative and capital backlash risk while preserving democratic values.

1pm - 2pm - Lunch

2pm - 5.30pm - Legal Challenges: Product Liability, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Ethics, Insurance, and Regulatory Compliance
Opal/Garnet Conference Room

Moderator
Prof Nicholas Wittner, Professor of Law in Residence, Michigan State University College of Law, USA

2pm - Regulation of highly automated vehicles
Emily Frascaroli, counsel, Ford Motor Co, USA
The development of highly automated, self-driving vehicles – which have the potential to help people drive more safely and facilitate mobility for everyone – is rapidly advancing. One of the key global challenges is creating a regulatory framework that encourages innovation, while also ensuring safety. Getting the right policies in place for automated vehicles is critically important and requires policy makers and other interested stakeholders to work together to reduce barriers and find a reasonable path forward to allow testing and deployment. This presentation explores the current challenges in the USA, and discusses some potential solutions under consideration.

2.25pm - Automated and connected vehicles require both privacy and cybersecurity
Prof Dorothy Glancy, professor of Law, Santa Clara University School of Law, USA
Assuring privacy and cybersecurity will present ethical and legal challenges for automated and connected vehicles. Trust that is essential to early acceptance of these innovative forms of advanced mobility will require demonstrated assurance of both privacy and cybersecurity. Ethical responsibilities regarding respect for the persons who use automated and connected vehicles are sure to be reflected in legal obligations. Relationships between privacy and cybersecurity are interestingly asymmetrical. An existing body of privacy laws, such as statutes restricting surveillance and personal information practices, is ready to apply to automated and connected vehicles. Laws governing cybersecurity are relatively scarce at present.

2.50pm - Road ready? Adapting safety standards for real-life public testing
Thomas Branigan, managing partner, Bowman and Brooke LLP, USA
The presentation will discuss adapting current safety standards and regulations to allow further testing of autonomous vehicles on public roads.

3.15pm - 3.45pm - Break

3.45pm - Product liability: bump in the road or big pothole?
Prof Nicholas Wittner, Professor of Law in Residence, Michigan State University College of Law, USA
A new era has begun: vehicle-to-vehicle communications systems and automated vehicle technologies. What legal liabilities, especially product liability, do they present? Are they novel ones? Will product liability laws stand as an obstacle to their full implementation? How can the legal risks be reduced to further their roll-out? Some legal scholars maintain that there is nothing special about them that the current liability laws cannot handle – no different from when buggies became horseless carriages. Others, including many legal practitioners, vehemently disagree. This presentation explores these issues and provides the roadmap for the panel discussion that follows.

4.10pm - 5.30pm - Panel Discussion - And Now the Law: Product Liability, Cybersecurity, Privacy, Ethics, Insurance, and Regulatory Compliance
This program presents a comprehensive overview and then detailed discussion of each of the significant legal issues involving the design, testing, development, and regulatory compliance of automated and connected vehicles. The presenters are leading lawyers, law professors, and auto industry counsel with deep expertise in federal and state regulations for deploying test and real-world fleets; product liability and ways to avoid it; cybersecurity and privacy laws; “ethical issues” for automated vehicle decision-making; and novel auto insurance challenges posed by these technologies.” (In short, everything you ever wanted to know about the law and automated and connected vehicles!)
Jennifer Dukarski, shareholder, Butzel Long, USA
Thomas Branigan, managing partner, Bowman and Brooke LLP, USA
Neal Walters, partner, Ballard Spahr LLP, USA
Jason Orr, attorney, O'Melveny & Myers LLP, USA
Thomas Alleman, member, Dykema Cox Smith, USA


Moderator:
Nicholas Wittner, Professor of Law in Residence, Michigan State University College of Law

 
 

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Conference Program:



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Hear what our attendees are saying about the event

The AV Safety Regulation Congress was one of the best meetings in this sector in the recent memory. The cross-cutting nature of the participants brought together OEMS, Federal agencies, state DOTS, state Department of Motor Vehicles, the insurance industry and regulators, and law enforcement. The organization of the Congress allowed for great opportunities for integrated discussions.

Don Hunt, senior fellow, Buechner Institute for Governance, University of Colorado

I was pleased to have the opportunity to have these conversations with the right people at the right time.

Catherine Curtis, Director Vehicle Programs, American Association of Motor Vehicle Administrators

Thanks again for organizing such an enjoyable event. I was very impressed both by those you recruited to speak and especially by those who came to listen. There were some important people sitting quietly in your audience and I look forward to attending again in 2017!

Bryant Walker Smith, assistant professor of law, University of South Carolina, USA

This first of its kind conference was an excellent opportunity to continue discussing the future of autonomous vehicle technology in the automotive industry. The outstanding mix of regulators, academics and legal professionals offered a variety of viewpoints to consider as this ground-breaking technology continues to develop and be introduced to the consuming public.

John Isaac Southerland, partner, Huie, Fernambucq & Stewart LLP, USA

The Autonomous Vehicle Safety Regulation Congress was a great venue for gathering representatives from various industries to discuss and explore the regulatory framework for autonomous vehicles. It was wonderful being a part of this event and helping to bring an insurance focus to the table. With varying state insurance regulators, it is crucial for the insurance industry to focus on what's emerging and to stay involved as vehicles evolve to become driverless.

Sandee Perfetto, coverage director, Personal Auto product development, Verisk Insurance Solutions, USA

Participating in the Autonomous Vehicle Safety Regulation World Congress 2016 was a great opportunity for the Michigan DOT to share insights with multiple industry sectors and government on this emerging technology. Autonomous vehicle technology has great promise of improving the safety of Michigan motorists, and we support its development within the State of Michigan.

Collin Castle, connected vehicle specialist, Michigan Department of Transportation, USA

The quality of speakers has been phenomenal. I’ve spent a lot of time listening to the presentations and it’s been really interesting to hear so many different opinions, great speakers, great conversations, dialogue, and definitely great networking. I sat in a VW presentation and not only was it really insightful, but it was also much more provocative than I was expecting

Meghan Chamberlain, marketing analyst, Robert Bosch

I was incredibly impressed with the exceptional quality of the speakers, and the timeliness of the program. We’re at the beginning at the era of the autonomous vehicle, and all the political, ethical and legal implications that go with it, so now is very much the time to do this”

Richard A. Lazar, principal, AV Insights LLC, USA